Evidence Library

Showing 7 of 7 results.
Jennifer Pomeranz, JD, MPH •
New York University
Andrea Garcia, JD, MPH •
American Medical Association
Randy Vesprey, JD, MPH •
Temple University

This dataset groups laws that did not specify employer type with laws directed at private employer programs because they likely apply to private employers in specific or limited circumstances.

 
Jennifer Pomeranz, JD, MPH •
New York University
Andrea Garcia, JD, MPH •
American Medical Association
Randy Vesprey, JD, MPH •
Temple University

This dataset groups laws that did not specify employer type with laws directed atprivate employer programs because they likely apply to private employers in specific or limited circumstances.

 
Jennifer Pomeranz, JD, MPH •
New York University

This study examined the variability in state laws related to workplace wellness programs for public and private employers. It finds that 33 states and DC had laws related to workplace wellness programs in 2014. State laws varied greatly in their methods to encourage or shape wellness program requirements.

Access maps on LawAtlas.org that detail laws for public and private employers.

 

Workplace injuries remain a significant public health problem. In the U.S. there were 4,383 fatal workplace injuries in 2012, and an estimated 3.8 million nonfatal injuries. Approximately 49,000 deaths each year are attributed to workplace-related illnesses. A 2011 economic analysis found that workplace injuries and illnesses cost the United States $192 billion annually.  

 
Patricia Sweeney, JD, MPH, RN •
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Center for Public Health Practice
Richard Zimmerman, MD, MPH, MA •
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Center for Public Health Practice

This study evaluated whether vaccination mandates, either by hospital policy or state law, may increase flu vaccine coverage for healthcare workers. The study finds that vaccination rates were significantly related to mandated vaccination with termination for noncompliance and declination or noncompliance that results in consequences other than termination.

 
Richard Zimmerman, MD, MPH, MA •
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Center for Public Health Practice

Overall annual influenza vaccination rate has slowly increased among health care workers but still remains below the national goal of 90 percent. One hundred fifty hospitals required influenza vaccination, 84 with consequences (wear a mask, termination, education, restriction from patient care duties, unpaid leave) and 66 without consequences for noncompliance. Hospitals whose mandates have consequences for noncompliance included a broader range of personnel, were less likely to allow personal belief exemptions, or to require formal declination.