Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 14 results.
Abraham Gutman, MA •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Kathleen Moran-McCabe, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Adrienne Ghorashi, Esq. •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Andrew Campbell, JD, MBA •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Lindsay Cloud, Esq •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This article introduces readers to policy surveillance as a method to create empirical legal datasets, using two examples from the field of housing law.

 
Abraham Gutman, MA •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Kathleen Moran-McCabe, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research
Scott Burris, JD •
Center for Public Health Law Research

This article outlines 23 legal mechanisms, or levers, that may impact health equity in housing in the United States, and reviews the evidence base evaluating each lever.

The article introduces a model that divides the levers among five core domains intended to promote greater health equity in housing:

 
Public Health Seattle & King County •

This dataset includes nearly 80 components of ordinances that govern the maintenance and inspection of existing housing, including provisions for habitability, injury, mold and pest prevention, air quality and lead and other toxins, including tobacco smoke, in the home. The ordinances presented here cover unincorporated King County, and all 39 municipalities therein.

 
Katrina Korfmacher, MS, PhD •
University of Rochester Medical Center

Childhood lead poisoning is widely recognized as one of the most significant environmental health problems impacting children in the United States, as well as many other countries. Lead is one of the longest-known, best-understood, and most well-monitored environmental toxins. Most (but not all) children with elevated blood lead levels are exposed to lead through lead hazards in older housing. Local policy approaches aim to reduce childhood lead poisoning by reducing the prevalence of lead hazards in high-risk housing, and do so by improving maintenance practices and controlling lead hazards.

 
Marc Edwards, PhD •
Virginia Polytechnic Institute

This study considers mandates requiring the partial replacement of lead pipes and the potential impact on rates of lead in the water.

The cumulative mass of lead release indicated that a typical partial replacement configuration did not provide a net reduction in lead when compared to 100 percent lead pipe. The partially replaced service line configuration also had a much greater likelihood of producing water with "spikes" of lead particulates at higher flow rates, while tending to produce lower levels of lead at very low flow rates.

 

Pages