Evidence Library

Showing 10 of 48 results.
Lainie Rutkow, JD, PhD •
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Caleb Alexander, MD, MS •
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

In the first year that two Florida laws aimed at curbing opioid prescriptions were in effect, the state's top opioid prescribers wrote significantly fewer prescriptions of this type of pain medication, according to a new study published June 2, 2016, in Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

 
Wenjun Li, PhD •
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Cheryl Sbarra, JD •
Massachusetts Association of Health Boards, Inc.
Margaret Reid •
Boston Public Health Commission

A 2011 Boston regulation that set minimum pricing and packaging requirements has successfully reduced the availability of fruit-flavored cigars that were becoming increasingly popular among youth, according to a new study published in Tobacco Control.

 
Ronald Bayer, PhD •
The Trustees of Columbia University of the City of New York
Amy Fairchild, PhD •
The Trustees of Columbia University of the City of New York

In this Perspective for the New England Journal of Medicine the authors compare US and UK approaches to harm reduction, particularly as it applies to e-cigarette policy.

 
Lainie Rutkow, JD, PhD •
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Caleb Alexander, MD, MS •
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

The study finds Florida’s efforts to prevent inappropriate use of painkillers are showing reductions among prescribers and patients who had the highest prescribing and usage rates.

 
Corey Davis, JD, MSPH •
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Drug overdose is the leading cause of injury-related death in the United States, killing more people every year than car crashes. While naloxone has been used in hospitals and ambulances for decades, the rising tide of overdose deaths has resulted in calls to make it more available to laypeople and first responders.

 
Corey Davis, JD, MSPH •
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Researchers reviewed 47 prescription monitoring program (PMP) websites for overdose content. They found that most PMPs did not address overdose or related terms in available materials and few state PMPs project overdose-specific messaging or provider tools for prevention.

 
Lainie Rutkow, JD, PhD •
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new study released on March 2, 2015, in Health Affairs reports that most primary care physicians are aware of prescription drug monitoring programs and have used the data in their practices, but do so only intermittently.

The study surveyed 420 physicians randomly identified through the American Medical Association’s Masterfile list. Of those physicians surveyed, 72 percent were aware of their state’s prescription drug monitoring program, and 53 percent reported that they had used the programs.

 
Corey Davis, JD, MSPH •
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

This study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, collected and characterized all statutes and regulations effective from 1998 through 2011 governing the operation of prescription monitoring programs. As of 2011, 10 states required PMPs to report suspicious activity to law enforcement, while only three required reporting to the patient’s physician. None required linkage to drug treatment or required all prescribers to review PMP data before prescribing. Few explicitly address data retention.

 

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