This study will measure whether quantity restrictions, electronic tracking, or a doctor’s prescription requirement for purchases of pseudoephedrine reduce the public health costs of methamphetamine production and use.

The project is the only one to measure the national effectiveness and cost effectiveness of the leading proposed policies for limiting domestic methamphetamine production: limiting the quantity of purchases, requiring a prescription, and electronic tracking. This research will also weigh the potential public health benefits of reducing the supply of methamphetamine against the potential loss of profits and consumer welfare caused by reduced access to effective cold medicine.